Career, Personal

The Leap

From an interview with Elle Luna featured on The Great Discontent .

I think that once you quit the job that’s paying the bills, the entire universe comes out to meet you. But it’s only after you quit your job that those people arrive, and that’s the secret that nobody knows. When you’ve made the leap and you’re far from shore, nothing is guaranteed, but we do it together and that’s what makes it worth it.

Read the rest here. There’s a very interesting bit about her applying to nine law schools and getting rejected by all of them. Then she applied to two art schools. When she was accepted to both, she took that as a sign. (Kinda reminds me of my seven failed bar attempts.)

On the beach in Montezuma, I met a guy from Kentucky. I don’t even know how work came up. He was ex-military, had his house in Lexington on the market, and was just hanging out in Costa Rica until it sold. He said that he  and his friend were moving to Los Angeles to work as screenwriters. I told him what I do. And he said, “You should quit your job.” My friend said, “I keep telling her. She won’t listen.”

If only it were that simple. But I can’t shake the idea that I am not the kind of person for whom a safety net will magically appear. That I will leap and land head-first on the concrete below.

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travel

Costa Rica

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Gallo pinto and eggs and the sweetest pineapple you’ll ever taste for breakfast. White-water rafting on Rio Sarapiqui. Mountain biking around Volcan Arenal. Vinyasa yoga in an open-air pavilion overlooking the Pacific, the sounds of the ocean and birds and white-faced capuchins and air moist with promise surrounding you in savasana. Snorkeling in the shimmering green waters of Isla Tortuga. Mornings in the hammock, Centenario and Coke at night. Even the rum tastes better there.

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